Bit early. But I answered a question on Quora about languages to learn for 2018.

Here’s what’s interesting me for 2018 :

I want to continue getting more experienced and better with Clojure. No language is perfect, but for me Clojure is the best language I’ve ever used. And I want to use it for more projects and in more different situations. I want Clojure to be my default / “workhorse” language for server-side, browser-based UI, Android apps. etc. Clojure is not just a great language but a practical language. And I’m expecting there to be more jobs / contracts available with it, going forward.

I’m intrigued by Rust. I haven’t even installed it yet. But I want to try it as a low-level C alternative. I have an idea it might be suitable for.

I admit that Richard Kenneth Eng and Peter Fisk are getting to me. I’d quite like to go back and have another look at / play with Smalltalk. I loved Smalltalk when I used it a bit in the late 80s / early 90s. But I now understand much more about programming than I did then. I want to compare it to what I now know about Lisp. Does Smalltalks’s simple consistent syntax / semantics actually offer the same kind of elegance, expressivity and power that I now see in Lisp? Plus, how are the modern Smalltalk environments / frameworks for useful application development?

I’m a big Python fan. I’ve written a lot of it over the last 15 years or so. However, everything is Python 2.7. I think it’s time to bite the bullet and get to terms with (and translate my outstanding code into) Python 3. Also, just learn more about some of the Python machine-learning / AI / big-data frameworks.

This year, as every year, I think I’ll finally sit down and do something with Prolog or more likely miniKanren / core.logic. The language is less important here. It’s about understanding how to work with the logic / relational paradigm.

Posted in Me.

The job was really to take C++, which was a fairly static language, and show people how to write dynamic programs in a static language. That’s what most of the patterns in that book were about. And in the process, patterns extended the life of C++ by a decade, which is not what I thought would happen. What I thought would happen is people, when they learned these patterns, would look at them and say, “Wow, these patterns are hard in C++ and they’re easy in Smalltalk. So if I want to think in terms of these patterns, I might as well use a language where they’re easily expressed.” And extend the life of Smalltalk by a decade. But the opposite happened.

I always suspected that the patterns everyone got so excited about were basically a way of overcoming static typing. Ward confirms it 🙂

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SqueekNOS is a project to create an operating-systemless Smalltalk. Ie. one where the Smalltalk machine replaces most of the operating system (apart from a small kernel I guess).

The nice thing about this : everything is inspectable / hackable. All the way down.

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A couple of great videos via Zbigniew

Avi Bryant’s powerful spreadsheet editor that remembers changes that you make by hand and can apply them in bulk to the rest of the lines in your spreadsheet. Note that Avi’s a Smalltalk guy, and a more primitive version of this (repeat last replace) has been in the Smalltalk environment for decades. Cool to see that Smalltalk ideas are still proving revolutionary 30 years later 🙂 (And cool of Avi to keep discovering them and taking them further)

Another way of doing something similar : Mass Edit which puts simultaneous editing cursors under the user’s command. Very clever. That’s from a video by David Huynh who seems to be involved in a lot of other neat research, like this mashup tool.

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