From a Quora answer I just made :

The protocol will still exist.

But there is now a real danger that “the internet” will have been successfully enclosed by private corporations.

What will that look like?

1. the end of net neutrality means that the phone companies / network providers can choose to prioritise packets from certain companies / services. They start to demand a premium from popular services.

2. most people don’t notice or care because they only use a few popular services anyway : Facebook, Google, Microsoft, Twitter, Pinterest, Netflix etc. These large corporations complain but start to pay the premium to be first class citizens. Packets from other services / web-addresses get deprioritized.

3. the commercial Content Delivery Networks probably play a role here. Basically anyone who wants to provide content to the public will need to go via a CDN because they’ll be the ones cutting the deals between the phone companies and any company smaller than Facebook and Google. That’s probably how Quora and Pinterest etc. will keep going.

4. Meanwhile, governments will continue to try to reassert control over internet content. In the name of clamping down on piracy, pornography, fake news, terrorism, online harassment, illegal crypto-currencies etc. they’ll start putting more pressure on online services to police their content. Facebook and Google will be increasingly required to co-operate. Smaller services will find they need to be vetted to get onto the CDN.

5. Also networking “hardware” is increasingly moved into software. Routers become generic boxes whose protocols are just software configuration.

6. Finally, phone companies, CDNs and router companies figure out some “improved” protocols which make the shaping and inspection of traffic more efficient. Stripped of the need to route generic packets from anywhere to anywhere, this new infrastructure, brought through a software update, is sold to the consumers as an “upgrade”.

7. By now, consumer IP is dead. Email protocols stop working. (Google and other “web-mail” providers arrange an alternative that looks the same but works over the new protocol. Or perhaps integrates directly with other messaging providers.) Communication is via Facebook and Twitter which work on the new protocol. Other P2P protocols that rely on IP also stop working. No more bittorrent, btsync, syncthing, webrtc etc.

IP survives as a “legacy system” for corporate users of course. Too many large companies still depend on it. But it will now be expensive, like most “enterprise” kit.

Within 20 years, we’ll find that the remaining “free” internet, where any ordinary person can hire a web-server and put up their own content independent of any of the major corporations or systematic government oversight is reduced to a tiny minority of hobbyists like amateur radio. Most people never access it or even know of its existence.

If you don’t like this scenario, NOW is the time to do something about it.

Not just do what you can to defend net-neutrality, but start to use the free / peer-to-peer, open protocols that we still have. Run your own web-site or blog. Use RSS to share content. Use webrtc to do your video conferencing, and bittorrent to share legitimate files. Do what you can to make sure that there is just too much demand and usage of the open protocols and internet that the large corporations can’t afford to try to switch it off because they know they’ll be losing too many customers.

Once most people aren’t using the internet, taking it away becomes easy.

Bit early. But I answered a question on Quora about languages to learn for 2018.

Here’s what’s interesting me for 2018 :

I want to continue getting more experienced and better with Clojure. No language is perfect, but for me Clojure is the best language I’ve ever used. And I want to use it for more projects and in more different situations. I want Clojure to be my default / “workhorse” language for server-side, browser-based UI, Android apps. etc. Clojure is not just a great language but a practical language. And I’m expecting there to be more jobs / contracts available with it, going forward.

I’m intrigued by Rust. I haven’t even installed it yet. But I want to try it as a low-level C alternative. I have an idea it might be suitable for.

I admit that Richard Kenneth Eng and Peter Fisk are getting to me. I’d quite like to go back and have another look at / play with Smalltalk. I loved Smalltalk when I used it a bit in the late 80s / early 90s. But I now understand much more about programming than I did then. I want to compare it to what I now know about Lisp. Does Smalltalks’s simple consistent syntax / semantics actually offer the same kind of elegance, expressivity and power that I now see in Lisp? Plus, how are the modern Smalltalk environments / frameworks for useful application development?

I’m a big Python fan. I’ve written a lot of it over the last 15 years or so. However, everything is Python 2.7. I think it’s time to bite the bullet and get to terms with (and translate my outstanding code into) Python 3. Also, just learn more about some of the Python machine-learning / AI / big-data frameworks.

This year, as every year, I think I’ll finally sit down and do something with Prolog or more likely miniKanren / core.logic. The language is less important here. It’s about understanding how to work with the logic / relational paradigm.

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