I’m working on a series of small “unifications”. Attempts to bring several of my different projects closer together. This is to share more code between them, or allow them to work more closely together.

Today, I’ve been updating BootDown, my quick and dirty static site generator so that it now uses the same library (txlib.py) as TSWiki to render markdown and embedded media like YouTube and SoundCloud.

This means that from now on, BootDown will use the same markup for embedding videos etc. as TSWiki : block defined with [<BLOCKTYPE ... >] containing metadata in YAML format. Also means that TSWiki now inherits an include CSV file block which renders as a reasonable looking table from BootDown.

This is a small change to a couple of files in a couple of projects, but it’s part of a general campaign of forward motion that will hopefully result in a bunch of projects becoming more powerful, more flexible and faster evolving this year.

Posted in Me.

Another Quora answer : Phil Jones’s answer to Why is C++ considered a bad language?

This is one of those rare occasions I disagree with Simon Kinahan; although his answer sets the scene for this one.

[Simon says that C++ isn’t a bad language. It’s the right choice if you need low-level memory control and the ability to build powerful higher-level abstractions.]

C++ is a bad language because it’s built on a flawed philosophy : which is that you should add power to a language by kludging it in “horizontally” in the form of libraries rather than “vertically” by building new Domain Specific Languages to express it.

Stroustrup is very explicit about this, rhetorically asking “why go to other languages for new features when you can add them as libraries in C++?”

Well, the answer is, adding new higher level conceptual thinking in the form of a library doesn’t really hide the old thinking from you. Or allow you to abandon it.

C++’s abstractions leak, more or less on purpose. Because you can never escape the underlying low-level thinking when you’re just using this stuff via libraries. You are stuck with the syntax and mindset of the low-level, even as you add more and more frameworks on top.

Yes, you can explicitly add garbage collection to a C++ program. But you can’t relax and stop thinking about memory management. It can’t disappear completely beneath the horizon of things you need to be aware of the way it does in Java.

Yes, you can have higher-level strings, that can abstract Unicode-ness etc. via a library. But you can never be sure that you won’t confront strings that are simple byte-arrays coming from another part of your large system.

Etc.

C++’s ability to build high-level abstractions uncomfortably falls between two stools.

It encourage you to think you can and should be building large applications full of application logic. But doesn’t give you the real abstracting power to focus only at that application level.

This explains the otherwise mysterious paradox that C is a good language, so how could something that is “C plus more stuff” possibly be a bad one? Well, it’s exactly the “more plussing” that’s the problem.

With C, you KNOW you should only use it to build relatively small things. It doesn’t pretend to offer you mechanisms to build big things. And so you turn to the obvious tools for scaling up : lex and yacc to build small scripting languages, the Unix pipe to orchestrate multiple small tools . C++ gives you just enough rope to hang yourself. Just enough powerful abstraction building capacity in the language itself that you (or that guy who used to work in your company 15 years ago ) thought it might be possible to reinvent half of Common Lisp’s data-manipulation capability and half an operating systems’ worth of concurrent process management inside your sprawling monolithic application.

I don’t see why it shouldn’t be possible to combine low-level memory management and efficiency with high level abstraction building. But proper abstraction building requires something more like macros or similar capabilities to make a level of expression which really transcends the low level. That’s exactly what C++ lacks.

My Quora answer : Phil Jones’s answer to What are some great truths of computer programming?

  1. The bug is your fault

  2. The bug is your fault

  3. The bug is your fault

  4. The bug is your fault

  5. The bug is your fault.

  6. No. The bug really IS your fault.

  7. The bug is your fault. Because you made an assumption that wasn’t true.

  8. The bug is your fault. And it won’t go away until you check your assumptions, find the one that isn’t true, and change it.

My Quora answer that’s pretty popular : (1) Phil Jones’s answer to What do you think computers will be like in 10 years?

Related to my previous story of trying to use the CHIP for work.

This is a $9 CHIP (Get C.H.I.P. and C.H.I.P. Prto)

It runs Debian. A couple of weeks ago, I took one travelling with me instead of my laptop to see what it would be like to use for real work.

I successfully ran my personal “productivity” software (three Python based wiki servers and some code written in Racket) from it. It also has a browser, Emacs and I was doing logic programming with minikanren library in Python. It runs Sunvox synth and CSOUND too, though I wasn’t working on those on this trip.

In 10 years time, that computing power will be under a dollar. And if anyone can be bothered to make it in this format, the equivalent of this Debian machine will be tantamount to free.

Of course most of that spectacular power will be wasted on useless stuff. But, to re-emphasize, viable computing power that you can do real work with, will be “free”.

The pain is the UI. How would we attach real keyboards, decent screens etc when we need them?

I HOPE that people will understand this well enough that our current conception of a “personal computer” will explode into a “device swarm” of components that can be dynamically assembled into whatever configuration is convenient.

I, personally, would LIKE the main processor / storage to live somewhere that’s strongly attached to my body and hard to lose (eg. watch or lanyard). I’d like my “phone” to become a cheap disposable touch-screen for this personal server rather than the current repository of my data.

I bought a cheap bluetooth keypad for about $8. It was surprisingly OK to type on, but connections with the CHIP were unreliable. In 10 years time, that ought to be fixed.

So, in 10 years time, I personally want a computer on my wrist that’s powerful to do all my work with (that means programming and creating music). That can be hooked up to some kind of dumb external keyboard / mouse / screen interface (today the Motorola Lapdock is the gold-standard) that costs something like $20. Sure, I’ll probably want cloud resources for sharing, publishing, storage and even high-performance processing, AI and “knowledge” etc.

And, of course, I want it to run 100% free-software that puts me in control.

This is all absolutely do-able.