The job was really to take C++, which was a fairly static language, and show people how to write dynamic programs in a static language. That’s what most of the patterns in that book were about. And in the process, patterns extended the life of C++ by a decade, which is not what I thought would happen. What I thought would happen is people, when they learned these patterns, would look at them and say, “Wow, these patterns are hard in C++ and they’re easy in Smalltalk. So if I want to think in terms of these patterns, I might as well use a language where they’re easily expressed.” And extend the life of Smalltalk by a decade. But the opposite happened.

I always suspected that the patterns everyone got so excited about were basically a way of overcoming static typing. Ward confirms it 🙂

SqueekNOS is a project to create an operating-systemless Smalltalk. Ie. one where the Smalltalk machine replaces most of the operating system (apart from a small kernel I guess).

The nice thing about this : everything is inspectable / hackable. All the way down.

A couple of great videos via Zbigniew

Avi Bryant’s powerful spreadsheet editor that remembers changes that you make by hand and can apply them in bulk to the rest of the lines in your spreadsheet. Note that Avi’s a Smalltalk guy, and a more primitive version of this (repeat last replace) has been in the Smalltalk environment for decades. Cool to see that Smalltalk ideas are still proving revolutionary 30 years later 🙂 (And cool of Avi to keep discovering them and taking them further)

Another way of doing something similar : Mass Edit which puts simultaneous editing cursors under the user’s command. Very clever. That’s from a video by David Huynh who seems to be involved in a lot of other neat research, like this mashup tool.